Not Everyone Agrees With the Dr. Phil Challenge … Many More Do

Yesterday, in response to my post titled Caregivers Are Joining the Dr. Phil Challenge  I received the following comments from  a man taking exception to my efforts to get Dr. Phil to help.  Presented here are his views and my responses. I respect his right to express his opinions just as I respect the comments of the caregivers that I will post as they come in. Including some at the end of this very long post.

Note: I wonder if David  realizes how many of his statements  highlight exactly why I am pleading with Dr. Phil to respond. Read on and see for yourself.

David Blair – You never were clear on what you thought Dr. Phil should have done for this woman? He obviously has a huge network of resources, but mostly for people with drug & psychological problem. After all that’s his profession. When he offers his support during the show it’s largely an effort to showcase, well advertise for these centers. And the guest gets free help as a result.  He doesn’t work with any day spas? How can you be certain the show didn’t help her financially, probably not something they would have aired.

The Imperfect Caregiver (Bobbi Carducci) – I am asking the Dr. Phil Foundation to establish grants to offset the costs of respite care. Even a few hours a week would be an enormous help for so many.

David Blair – Well, as some of your commenters pointed out – there are currently millions of people in that situation. You don’t think Dr. Phil has THAT kinda money. This goes on in nearly every family in this country.  My mom spent and amazing amount of time caring for my grandparents. I think it’s a situation many find themselves in. Families have to step up. Dr. Phil can fix a lot, but he can’t make family members compassionate if they don’t choose to be? Just asking you consider the scale of what you are expecting.

The Imperfect Caregiver – Bobbi Carducci – I hear you. I don’t expect him to fund it all. I’m asking for an opportunity to use his resources to get the message out about what it’s really like and offer SOME funding via the Dr. Phil Foundation for some in desperate need. He dropped the ball when he asked that young woman what was the hardest part of caring for her father and she said, “lifting him several times a day,” and his response was to tell her not to feel guilty about wanting time for herself. Do I think Dr. Phil has THAT kind of money? No. Do I think he can inspire others to help? Yes, I do. Just as I don’t expect him to end domestic violence himself or fix every drug addict alone. He does assist some and that is what I am hoping for and asking from him. Get the dialog and the support moving.

David Blair – I think he did use his resources to get the message out. I admit, probably the only show I watch regularly. THAT”S RIGHT! (don’t care what anyone think either.)

He’s a smart guy. Every time I’m wondering what the fu@k’s he gonna say about that? But he always says the right thing – and always a 180 from what I’d say)

Not meaning to sound unsympathetic to your cause but trying to set up a fund then try to decide (based on I don’t know what) who should get the money the logistics of which are unimaginable! Not his job or responsibility. His only responsibility is to entertain me at 3 o’clock.)

The Imperfect Caregiver – Bobbi Carducci – Thank you for your thoughts on this. Enjoy the show.

 Read More Comments by Caregiver’s Joining the Dr. Phil Challenge:

Donna Thomson – Comment: Great idea, Bobbi!  Have you written to the foundation?  Where are they based – perhaps a personal meeting or skype meeting would be appropriate.  Well done for identifying this opportunity!

doggonedmysteries Margaret Hauser –  Comment: It’s easy to give advice when you aren’t the caregiver. I consider myself lucky when The Curmudgeon, my husband who has secondary progressive Multiple Sclerosis, is having a good enough day where I can leave him alone for a couple of hours.I can’t afford to have someone come in and give me a break. We live on his meager disability income because I can’t leave him alone for more than a couple of hours at a time. Some days not at all, depending on how bad his day is.

I haven’t had a real break in over a year. How about if Dr. Phil comes over and takes care of The Curmudgeon for a week and finds out what it is really like?I bet he wouldn’t be quite so free with his ‘advice to caregivers on taking care of themselves’ when he finds out that is not an easy thing to do when you have to take care of a home and a patient. I am not now nor have I ever been a nurse, so this is truly difficult.

Lisa Land – Comment: I am a caregiver for my 89 yr old father and saw the show as well. I wondered the same thing, why did he NOT help this girl? So many of us including myself are caregiving without an income and living off of the income of our carees, which is Social Security and is keeping us just above the poverty level. I am forwarding this to everyone I can to sign and get recognition.

Cathy Kelly – Comment: I am a caregiver for my friend and also was for his parents because there wasnt anyone else.  I am stuck here trying to get him help so I can get out. 8 years worth of ongoing stress is far too much. Help! Please! I dont want to go down with the ship.

Laura Walsh – Comment: amen to that , my husband can not be left alone, after massive stroke , bed ridden , hoyer lift to wheel chair  , canot speak or do anything for hmself  … we know what to do , but never get a chance to do it , all my energy is put into care giving and cooking and cleaning and ordering meds and doing every single need for my husband , all day long , every day , and in the middle of the night , every night … going on 4 years now !!! wearing pretty thin !!! It is almost an insult for someone to say remember to take care of yourself first , so you can take care of him , I know they mean well , but >>>>>

Jennien Seymour – Comment: well Dr Phil..unless you have given up your independence, place to live, and your job…to care for someone 24/7….you have no idea what it is like…there for you can not give advice on something you have no idea about.

Janet Ogaick – Comment: as a caregiver to my father until he passed away your advice truly means nothing what I needed was someone to help so I could have time for me time to be a mother to my 4 children time to unwind I don’t regret being my fathers caregiver he did for me and it was my turn to do for him but an hour or two a week it would have been wonderful

Carlene Reaves  – Comment: Thank you Dr. Phil for recognizing caregivers and how awesome they are. It would have been nice if you would have helped her do what you advised her to do. Much love!

Theresa Loder – Comment: as a caregiver for the past 20 years .. Parents, mother in law , and now for my husband who has many health issues, I often hear( at least once a day) for me to take care of myself..

I do my best to do that .. But it’s very hard for people not caregiving to understand the moment to moment challenges we all face.. Yes , it would be nice it someone who has a platform , to offer actual help to caregivers..

It is very hard to find any kind of respite out there..

Currently I am trying to get well from Bronchitis I picked up either in the hospital or nursing home where my husband had been recently.. He ended up with pneumonia..

This is the first time I had to go to the ER for myself .. We caregivers would appreciate any and all actual help we can receive by way of letting people know the challenges we face on a minute to minute basis. Most all of us are going to be faced with this someday… There needs to be lots of discussion about all things caregiving… Sooner rather than .  positive thoughts to all caregivers out there.. Theresa Loder

Contact Dr. Phil and add your voice to the Imperfect Caregiver challenge: http://drphilfoundation.org/  http://www.drphil.com/   @DrPhil   https://www.facebook.com/drphilshow?fref=ts

 

More caregiver comments tomorrow.

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Rebecca
    Jun 03, 2015 @ 10:22:09

    Respite care is undoubtedly a great benefit for some, but not everyone actually requires constant supervision. As caregiver for my husband who was disabled both physically and cognitively from a stroke 4 years ago, and for my mother and aunt, ages 85 and 89 respectively and who are in a local retirement community, what I would appreciate enormously is if family and friends would just “be present” for us. Couples with whom we socialized never visit anymore and only rarely suggest meeting for lunch. I know it’s not much fun to be with someone who has difficulty carrying on a conversation, but he would feel a lot more “normal” and less isolated if they would come around once in awhile. And while family members almost always are willing to help with a specific request or need, my husband always feels like they’re “babysitting” him because that’s the only time they ever come over. And my mother and aunt would dearly love someone to invite them to a musical event, or take them for a drive somewhere other than the usual stops that the retirement community offers. So, David Blair, yes, family should “step up,” but since we’re all “a village,” to borrow a phrase, the rest of the community could also “step up” and be a blessing as well.

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    • Bobbi Carducci
      Jun 03, 2015 @ 10:35:42

      Rebecca,
      Thank you for pointing out the different levels of caregiving. We are not all alike and not everyone needs as much assistance. People do need social interaction and it’s far too often one of the things that fall by the wayside. A large part of why I decided to challenge Dr. Phil is to get the “village” to understand what it’s really like and how isolated caregivers and those needing care become.

      You stated it beautifully when you wrote, ” … “what I would appreciate enormously is if family and friends would just “be present” for us,” and “So, David Blair, yes, family should “step up,” but since we’re all “a village,” to borrow a phrase, the rest of the community could also “step up” and be a blessing as well.”
      I hope you will continue to comment as you see fit. Your feelings and comments speak for many.

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